New Web 2.0 and Blogging Conference To Hit Toronto

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Last night at “DemoCamp 3.0”:http://barcamp.pbwiki.com/TorCampDemoCamp3 here in Toronto “Michael McDerment”:http://www.michaelmcderment.com announced that he, “Matthew Ingram”:http://mathewingram.com/work/, “Rob Hyndman”:http://www.robhyndman.com, “Mark Evans”:http://evans.blogware.com/, and “Stuart MacDonald”:http://stuartmacdonald.ca/ are working on a conference for all us Toronto-bound Web 2.0/Social Media/Blog/Feed/AJAX/etc. fans.
Right now they are sharing their ideas and soliciting input:
* “Michael’s Post”:http://www.michaelmcderment.com/article/DemoCamp3-and-Conference.html
* “Matthew’s Post”:http://www.mathewingram.com/work/index.php/2006/02/21/hey-my-dad-has-a-barn-lets-put-on-a-show/
* “Rob’s Post”:http://www.robhyndman.com/2006/02/21/new-toronto-web-20-conference/
* “Mark Evan’s Post”:http://evans.blogware.com/blog/_archives/2006/2/21/1775451.html
With such heavy-hitters behind it, expect to hear lots on this around the blogosphere. In fact “memeorandum has already picked it up”:http://tech.memeorandum.com/060221/p32#a060221p32.
Take a look at what they are up to and give them some feedback – on their sites or here – about what you’d like to see and what you would _not_ like to see.
Please mark me down as one vote for “no panels”.

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5 thoughts on “New Web 2.0 and Blogging Conference To Hit Toronto

  1. Ken Schafer

    I knew one of you guys would come along and ask me that! Now I need to form a coherent response…
    I guess what I’m saying is that a straight up panel session doesn’t deliver much value. Generally I’ve found that people come poorly prepared because they don’t feel they have to carry the whole show. Or each panelist does a short presentation at a very high-level but doesn’t get to the heart of the matter.
    I like in-depth sessions by one speaker where they’ve really done some serious thinking about what they want to communicate that will benefit a particular audience OR a (ahem) conversation amongst an intelligent group of peers unafraid of having a real discussion about real issues. These need to have really strong moderators and can’t be structured like a panel.
    One thing that really helps is having “comfy chairs” on stage instead of a table with mics separating audience and those on stage. AIMS used couches on stage for some of the most successful “conversation mode” presentations.
    Just my $0.02.

  2. Keith Holloway

    Please mark me down as one vote FOR panels.
    Most of the conferences I have attended lately have provided very little information at the level I am looking for.
    I find the people I meet and the connections I make are the most valauble uses of conferences. Yet occasionally, some real jewels of information come out of panel sessions because they are unscripted and ususally somebody says too much – which is the great part.
    This sounds like a great conference. I am looking forward to learning more.

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