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Month: September 2006

Reporting From CaseCampToronto 3

What a night. CaseCampToronto 3 was a riot.
Once again “Eli Singer”:http://www.singer.to/ organized a great event at the hip Fifth Club. This is third one under his belt with others spawning off in Montreal and Vancouver. The “CaseCamp”:http://www.casecamp.org concept is proving to be no flash in the pan.
Hats off also to the folks at “Cundari”:http://www.cundari.com/ and “Microsoft”:http://www.microsoft.ca/ for supporting the event financially with no strings attached (i.e. no boring product pitches). Cundari also graciously picked up the food and bar tab as well.
Having attended the previous two CaseCamps as a member of the peanut gallery, I decided to step into the line of fire and present the “Greatest Escapes campaign”:http://www.searstravel.tmcontest.com that “we”:http://www.searstravel.ca are currently running.
The questions, comments and feedback from the audience were great. For example, one person suggested adding a sense of urgency to our campaign to drive higher conversion. And the beauty is that I didn’t have to pay a consulting fee or run a test group to get feedback. Excellent ROI for a 15 minute presentation.

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DigitalEve Toronto Calls It Quits

One of the city’s oldest associations has announced that it will not continue because of lack of funds and lack of interest. Here are the details. Let’s hope it isn’t a trend that will impact other associations.

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QotD – How Much Visitor Information Can We Share?

Today’s QotD is directly related to you, our esteemed reader, and me, the publisher of One Degree:

Through the email addresses of our subscribers and the IP addresses of site visitors we can create a list that reads like the who’s who of Internet marketing agencies and clients in Canada. I’d love to publish these to show potential sponsors the quality of our readership. But I hesitate because the information, while general and aggregated, seems like something people might consider sensitive. For example, I could say “people from FedEx and BlastRadius visit our site weekly.” Is that an invasion of privacy and inappropriate disclosure?

Discuss.

BTW, the feedback here will largely make the decision for me on what I do in fact publish – so make your case if you feel strongly one way or the other!

10 Comments

Why I Include My Feed in My Sig File

One Degree:Jordan, can you tell us about your .sig file and what the pros and cons of your approach are?”
I use the animated headline feature from “Feedburner”:http://www.feedburner.com/ in my .sig file, to publicize my blog. It is a very cool feature that I think everyone should try (provided they have a Feedburner feed associated with their site). The response to it has been overwhelmingly positive, and I have to agree that it does give my messages an extra bit of credibility than a static text “siggy” or even a company logo would.
Here’s a peek at what we’re talking about here:
Jordan Behan
www.telltenfriends.com
778.840.TELL (8355)

Tell Ten Friends by Jordan
Jordan Behan: I opted to list just my url, and not a full company name and title, in exchange for less content to have to look at. I’m still pretty convinced this was a good decision, as it shouldn’t be too busy, in my opinion.
When people first see it, it’s not out of the ordinary for them to say “Wow, I want one of those!” But here is where I start to list the cons of this method. I do web marketing and PR consulting, specializing in small business. Many of my clients and prospects discover what an RSS feed is when I explain it to them, and not before. If you’re not already familiar with the use of feeds, then you might not understand the content that you see when you click the link in the animated .gif. I have yet to have anyone ask about the “site” they get linked through to when they click, but I have to guess that for some it is a bit confusing. They might have expected to be linked to my site, not the Feedburner feed.

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Is Podcasting the New “Plastics”?

In the seminal 1967 film "The Graduate,” college student Benjamin Braddock (played by Dustin Hoffman), is offered some career advice by an older businessman:

Mr. McGuire: Are you listening?
Benjamin: Yes, I am.
Mr. McGuire: Plastics.

It is my personal opinion that were this conversation to take place today, Mr. McGuire would be tipping Benjamin off to podcasting. I know I would.

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