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One Degree Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Toms: Just where are people getting their election news in social media age?

One evening during the last provincial election campaign, I was putting up lawn signs with a friend and I commented that I was out of touch with how retail politics is practised. Lawn signs, flyers in mailboxes, door-knocking etc. – the fundamentals of local campaigns haven’t changed. However, I strongly suspect I no longer (if I ever did) understand how much of public opinion today is formed, and more topically, why and for whom we vote.

OTTAWA CITIZEN

Promise tracker: What the parties are pitching on the campaign trail

Run deficits for the next four years — $27.4 billion next year, falling to $21 billion by the fourth year of the mandate. Lower the debt-to-GDP ratio to 30.2 per cent by 2023-24.

Increase Canada Student Grants by 40 per cent. Extend a student-loan-repayment grace period to two years from six months. Increase the threshold at which recent graduates would have to start repaying loans to $35,000 of income, up from $25,000. Allow new parents to pause repayments until their youngest child turns five, without accruing interest during that time.

NATIONAL POST

From innovation to regulation: why the Liberals have lost their way on digital policy

The 2015 Liberal campaign platform that vaulted the party from third place to a majority government made a big economic bet that focusing on innovation would resonate with voters and address mounting concern over Canadian competitiveness. Innovation would serve as a guiding principle over the years that followed: The Minister of Industry was reframed as Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, millions were invested in innovation superclusters and global leadership on artificial intelligence was touted as a national priority.

GLOBE AND MAIL

CANADA’S ‘NO NAME’ BRAND LAUNCHES ITS LARGEST AD CAMPAIGN EVER

No Name (yes, really), one of Canada’s most unique and recognizable private-label brands, has launched its largest and most exhaustive marketing campaign since the 1970s, using a combination of TV spots, social media branding and out-of-home ads to get the word out about its latest health label—while also having some clever fun.

AD AGE

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