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What’s interesting … Tuesday, April 16, 2019

26 incredibly useful things you didn’t know Google Calendar could do

If there’s one digital tool I rely on as much as Gmail, it’s Google Calendar.

From work deadlines to family happenings and random reminders, Calendar is what keeps me on track, on time, and on top of the approximately 1.7 zillion things I tend to juggle on an hourly basis. And the more I’ve used it, the more I’ve learned just how flexible it is—and how many easily overlooked options it offers for enhancing its interface, getting stuff accomplished more efficiently, and making the service work in whatever way makes sense for my own personal workflow.

FAST COMPANY

Canada Joins the World in a Social Media Crackdown

Unlike the last American presidential election, there was no obvious cybermeddling when Canadians voted in 2015 (nor, for that matter, are there signs of it in Alberta, where I’m writing this week’s newsletter as residents get ready to vote on Tuesday).

NYT

Why Modern Cities Should Migrate to an HCMS

As local government’s budgets shrink and the public sector continues to lose talent to the private sector, local governments are challenged to do more with less. There is a new facet to the quagmire that is now applying even more pressure to already strained teams: the growth of new, emerging digital communication channels, and citizens’ expanding desire for meaningful, impactful, seamless interactions with private and public sector entities.

GOVERNMENT TECHNOLOGIES

WHAT’S THE IMPACT OF LUSH’S DECISION TO ABANDON SOCIAL MEDIA

Following growing concerns around privacy and the negative PR generated after the fallout of 2018’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook announced a shift towards ‘meaningful engagement’.

Trumpeted as an attempt to bring people closer together, the result for brands was significantly reduced organic reach, declining engagement and ultimately rising media costs via Facebook (and Instagram’s) paid advertising platform.

PR WEEK

Canada’s entrepreneurs say not getting paid on time hinders growth

Getting paid on time is a major problem for Canadian entrepreneurs. According to a survey from Interac Corp., seven in 10 (71 per cent) of Canadian side hustlers and micro-businesses (businesses with up to five employees) struggle to get paid on time, and spend valuable time chasing late payments. More than half of respondents (58 per cent) say following up to get paid is a drain on their time and productivity, and a quarter (25 per cent) are not spending enough time growing their business as a result.

CISION

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